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Effects of Alcoholism on Children

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The effects of alcoholism on children can be detrimental. The effects can destroy a childhood. Children do not understand that alcoholism is a disease all they understand is that their mother or father drinks a lot and maybe is abusive to the other parent and even to the child and their siblings. Sadly, one in four children is exposed to alcohol abuse or dependency at some point before the age of 18.

The children may see that there is not enough food in the house to eat, or enough money to go to the movies with their friends. They may also see in the case of a single parent home what it is like to take care of and clean up after an alcoholic parent. Instead of spending Saturday night at their friend’s house or at the football game, they get to stay home and clean up vomit and drag their alcoholic parent to the couch to sleep it off.

Often times when these children become teenagers they start to abuse alcohol as a way to forget even if for only a little while what they have to look forward to when they get home.

It would be a lie to say there are not effects of alcoholism on children. Every child is effected by alcoholism in one way or another and sadly, when it comes to the effects of alcoholism on children there is no lesser of the two evils all the effects are equally evil. Even more tragic is the fact that more than 22 million children wear the label of “child of an alcoholic” in the just the United States.

Many of these children grow up to be alcoholics themselves, others run away from home and end up on the streets. The strongest of the strong end up with emotional scars and spend hours sitting in the therapists chair trying to convince themselves it was not their fault.

Before alcoholics have children they should really consider all of the effects of alcoholism on children the possibility of abuse (physical, mental, verbal, emotional, sexual), the lack of money to be spent on necessities, and the amount of money those children will spend in therapy in adulthood.